SEND Training

SEND (Special Educational Needs & Disabilities) Training. At the heart of what DTSA is about, is exploring the best education for all children in all schools.  After an initial survey with local SENDCO’s (Special Educational Needs & Disabilities Co-Ordinators) it was found that specialist training in this area was lacking and that SENCO’s were burning out too quickly with a feeling that they were unsupported in their roles without specialist training.

To encourage teachers and SENDCO’s to stay in the profession within our local area is a priority for DTSA and so we are funding SEND training needs across the East Midlands area to help keep these valuable professional supported in their roles to help maintain teacher retention rates.

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Learn about more of DTSA’s charitable activities and the work being delivered in schools by following the links to these pages:

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Who are we working with?

DTSA have supported the following schools

Pear Tree Infants SEND funding

Pear Tree Infant School and Walbrook Nursery School

DTSA funded the SENCO who works across both schools, to complete NASCO – National Award for SEN Coordination, a mandatory qualification for SENCOs.

“The school is in a deprived part of Derby, with our demographic comprising of above national average EAL (English as additional language), above average of disadvantaged children and above average of children with SEN. The bespoke needs of school in relation to the servitude to Roma Gypsy community requires a great deal of additional resourcing.”

Whitecross nursery SEND funding 1

Whitecross Nursery School

DTSA funded a SENCO who works in the teacher-led Nursery School, to complete NASCO – National Award for SEN Coordination, a mandatory qualification for SENCOs.

The Nursery School has shared a SENCO with another local Nursery School for a number of years. A SENCO now works in school with the children, to improve the provision and get the early help needed for starting primary school in order to “raise the bar and close the gap for the progress and achievement of all children.”

Ridgeway logo

Ridgeway Infant School

Ridgeway Infant School hired a new SENDCo, and wished for them to engage with the NASCO programme. The programme fully meets DfE requirements, and equips participants with the skills and knowledge necessary to coordinate their school’s SEN provision.

The school has a strong reputation for SEND and inclusion, with a higher than national average percentage of children with EHCP’s to support. As such, it’s important that their staff receive the best training possible to support their student’s complex needs. They have an extensive SEND team, which is managed and co-ordinated by the SENDCo, maktheing  importance of high-quality training a top priority for the institution.

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Meadow Farm Community School

With Meadow Farm Community School’s SENDCo on maternity leave, a new SENDCo was hired to cover this period of absence.

“The training ensured that the SENDCo is up to speed with the latest methods and processes, giving them greater direction for their work within the new school. In addition, the training will give the new staff member a greater network of SEND contacts for support, guidance and the sharing of practices.”

The school hopes that this training will allow the new SENDCo to make a good start at Meadow Farm, providing them with all the support needed to be effective in their workload, direct their support where it is needed, and be well informed in this area.

Silverhill primary

Silverhill Primary School

Silverhill wanted their new SENCO to undertake the National Award for SEN Co-Ordination, run by Best Practice Network.

Gaining this award is an excellent opportunity for professional development, which the school hopes will increase the confidence, knowledge and understanding of their SENCO and the role which they hold, allowing them to reflect upon and improve their practice. They will be able to oversee the day-to-day operation of the school’s SEN policy, co-ordinate the provision for SEN children, and provide necessary guidance and support to both the school staff and the parental community.

“The course will enable the SENCO to draw upon relevant research in relation to the teaching and learning of Silverhill’s SEN children which development and implementing new strategies for improving the learning outcomes for pupils with SEN and/or disabilities.”

meadow farm logo

Meadow Farm Community School

DTSA funded a staff member at Meadow Farm Community School to undergo ELSA training, to help them better support the needs of SEMH pupils.

“We have many mobile pupils and our school stability is 68% (well below national average). A proportion of pupils arrive at our school with SEMH difficulties – either diagnosed or undiagnosed. Having an ELSA trained member of staff will really benefit our pupils in the following ways:

  • to settle into our school and transition from a different school or home schooling.
  • to support with establishing a friendship group eg: circle of friends
  • to support with any trauma the child has experienced.
  • to support our pupils to attend school every day (our mobile pupils often have a history of poor attendance)
  • to support our pupils with any wider issues of SEN linked to anxiety ie: those diagnosed and undiagnosed with autism.
  • to provide interim support for pupils who are waiting for a SPOA acceptance or a referral to an external wellbeing service.

Alongside this, our ELSA trained member of staff will provide support to other Teaching Assistants in school so that we can cascade the training to others in school.”

 

Emotional Literacy Support Assistant (ELSA) Training and Supervision

About ELSA

ELSA is a nationally recognised training programme developed to build the capacity of schools to support the emotional needs of their pupils from within their own resources. The training improves Teaching Assistants’ understanding of emotional dysregulation and develops their skills so that they can deliver effective individualised support programmes to meet the emotional needs of children and teenagers. Pupils supported by ELSAs develop their self-awareness and self-management skills so they can successfully identify and regulate their emotions and become more emotionally resilient.

Aims of the Programme

  • To train ELSAs to plan and deliver programmes of support to pupils in their school who are experiencing temporary or longer term additional emotional needs. The majority of ELSA work is expected to be delivered on an individual basis.
  • To provide on-going professional supervision to help maintain high quality in the work undertaken by ELSAs, thereby helping to ensure safe practice for ELSAs and pupils alike.
murray park logo

Murray Park Community School

Murray Park applied for funding for bespoke whole team Level 2 training from Team Teach.

The Team Teach training was beneficial for their staff and students, allowing staff to develop skills in:

  • Understanding Behaviour
  • All Behaviour is communication
  • Circles of Influence
  • Conflict Spiral
  • Planning & Risk Assessment
  • De-escalation and De-fusion
  • Verbal & Non-Verbal Communication
  • Repair, Reflection and Review
  • Positive Handling

It allowed the AP team to promote the wellbeing of SEND and support disadvantaged students through suppotive behaviour managment, targeted mentoring leading to an increase in positive mental health.

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Cavendish Close Infant and Nursery School

Two training session were delivered to the full staff team at Cavendish Close Infant and Nursery School, providing excellent value for money: 12 teachers, 2 learning mentors, 15 teaching assistants and 4 midday supervisors – 31 staff members in all.

The school’s preferred training model is to train their full staff team as ‘everyone is a teacher of SEND’, which enables their provision as a whole to progress allowing consistency for all children.

Session 1: ‘Emotional regulation interactive training for staff’, delivered by Educational Psychologist, JEM Psychology Ltd.

The workshop event covered the learning points outlined below to refresh the knowledge and skills of all staff. The session emphasised the importance of utilising a whole school approach to meeting the emotional literacy needs of all pupils in school, but particularly for those pupils experiencing difficult or uncomfortable emotions:

  • short overview of Emotion Coaching including the social engagement and stress arousal systems
  • short overview of Zones of Regulation including self-awareness, emotional expression and social awareness
  • how the two approaches complement one another
  • practical activities for implementing and embedding both approaches
  • opportunities to share good practice and recent successes

Session 2: ‘An introduction to attachment, trauma and loss: To understand what attachment, trauma and significant loss are and how they affect behaviour and learning, and to explore strategies to support pupils with insecure attachment’, delivered by trainers C. Schloss and A. Fower.

Staff are better at recognising and supporting the emotional needs of their pupils who have experienced trauma, neglect etc. as a result of receiving the training, with the impact being:

  • A positive impact on the classroom environment, promoting secure attachments between the teacher and pupils.
  • Helping staff to create a positive supportive classroom ethos to impact pupil emotional wellbeing and academic performance.
  • Helping to develop secure attachment styles.
  • Helping the staff to understand their emotions and that of others.

Session 3: ‘Emotional regulation interactive training for staff’, led by trainer Dr Judith McAlister.

The workshop event covered the learning points outlined below to refresh the knowledge and skills of all staff. The session emphasised the importance of utilising a whole school approach to meeting the emotional literacy needs of all pupils in school, but particularly for those pupils experiencing difficult or uncomfortable emotions and looked at:

  • Emotion Coaching including the social engagement and stress arousal systems
  • Zones of Regulation including self-awareness, emotional expression and social awareness
  • How the two approaches complement one another
  • Practical activities for implementing and embedding both approaches
  • Opportunities to share good practice and recent successes

Session 4: ‘An introduction to attachment, trauma and loss’ delivered by C. Schlos and A. Fower.

This session was held to understand what attachment, trauma and significant loss are and how they affect behaviour and learning.

Staff who receive the training are often better at recognising and supporting the emotional needs of their pupils who have experienced trauma, neglect etc:

  • It positively impacted upon the classroom environment, promoting secure attachments between the teacher and pupils.
  • It helped staff to create a positive supportive classroom ethos to impact on pupil emotional wellbeing and academic performance.
  • It helped develop secure attachment styles.
  • It helped the staff to understand their emotions and that of others.
Bemrose

The Bemrose School

Tuition fees for staff member to gain NASENCO qualification.

The training has expanded the capacity of the school’s SEND provision in their primary setting. By having a fully qualified colleague with the NASENCO qualification in the setting full time it enables them to provide swifter support around diagnosis, intervention and support as well as providing wider advice to parents and other care givers.

Long Row-767

Long Row Primary and Nursery School

A staff member will receive the National Accreditation of SEND (NASCO) qualification, delivered by the University of Derby.